Global assembling of Academicians, Researchers, Scholars & Industry to disseminate and exchange information at 100+ Allied Academics Conferences

Theme
Novel Insights and Innovations in the Treatment of Dementia
- Dementia Congress 2020

About Conference

Dementia Congress 2020
It is an amalgamation of several esteemed academic and scientific associations known for promoting scientific temperament

We invite the participants from all over the world to attend World Congress on Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease scheduled on March 23-24, 2020 in London, UK which includes prompt keynote presentations, oral talks, poster presentations and exhibitions

Objective:

Dementia Congress 2020 is a platform to fulfill the prevailing gaps in the transformation of this science of hope, to serve promptly with solutions to all in the need. Dementia Congress 2020 will have an anticipated participation of 120+ delegates across the world to discuss the conference goal

About Organizers:

It is one of the leading Open Access publishers and organizers of international scientific conferences and events every year across USA, Europe & Asia. It has so far organized 3000+ Global Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+Workshops on Medical, Pharmacy, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business with 700+ peer-reviewed open access journals in basic science, health, and technology

Scientific Sessions:

Dementia Congress 2020 will encompass recent researches and findings in technologies, therapies and transplantation, advancements in research. Dementia Congress 2020 will be a great platform for research scientists and young researchers to share their current findings in this field of applied science. The major scientific sessions in Dementia Congress 2020 will focus on the latest and exciting innovations in prominent areas

Target Audience:

Neurologists, Directors of Institutes, Physicians, Neuroscientists, Specialists in Neurosciences, Researchers, Health Care Professionals, Professors, Lecturers, Students and others involved in the study of Dementia

Welcome Message

We welcome all the attendees, speakers, sponsors and other research expertise from all over the world to the World Congress on Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease scheduled on March 23-24, 2020 in London, UK


We are very much honoured to invite you all to exchange and share your views and experience on Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

 

Allied Academies is organizing Dementia Congress 2020 along with 300+ Conferences across USA, Europe & Asia every year with support from 1000 more scientific societies and Publishes 400+ Open access journals which contains over 30000 eminent personalities as editorial board members


We invite you to join us at Dementia Congress 2020, where you will be sure to have a meaningful experience with scholars from around the world. Organizing Committee Members of Dementia Congress 2020 look forward to meeting you in London, UK

Sessions and Tracks

Session 1: Dementia
Dementia isn't a specific disease. Instead, dementia describes a group of symptoms affecting memory, thinking and social abilities severely enough to interfere with daily functioning. Though dementia generally involves memory loss, it has different causes. So memory loss alone doesn't mean you have dementia. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of a progressive dementia in older adults, but there are a number of causes of dementia. Depending on the cause, some dementia symptoms can be reversed

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 2: Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that usually appears in late adolescence or early adulthood. Characterized by delusions, hallucinations, and other cognitive difficulties, schizophrenia can often be a lifelong struggle. Schizophrenia most commonly strikes between the ages of 16 and 30, and males tend to show symptoms at a slightly younger age than females. In many cases, the disorder develops so slowly that the individual does not know that they have had it for many years. However, in other cases, it can strike suddenly and develop quickly. Schizophrenia affects approximately 1 present of all adults, globally. Experts say schizophrenia is probably many illnesses masquerading as one. A sizable proportion of people with schizophrenia have to rely on others because they are unable to hold a job or care for themselves. Many may also resist treatment, arguing that there is nothing wrong with them. Some patients may present clear symptoms, but on other occasions, they may seem fine until they start explaining what they are truly thinking

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies : Alzheimer's Association| American Cancer Society | AARP | Habitat for Humanity | Volunteer Match | Doctors Without Borders | WWOOF | Make-A-Wish Foundation | Peace Corps | Voluntary Service Overseas | Cross-Cultural Solutions | American Brain Foundation | Cure Alzheimer's Fund | Alzheimer's Foundation of America | Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation | Alzheimer's Research & Prevention Foundation | Bright Focus | Lewy Body Dementia Association | The Scottish Dementia Working Group (SDWG) | The Lewy Body Society

 Session 3: Brain diseases

The brain is body’s control center. It’s part of the nervous system, which also includes the spinal cord and a large network of nerves and neurons. Together, the nervous system controls everything from your five senses to the muscles throughout your body. When your brain is damaged, it can affect many different things, including your memory, your sensation, and even your personality. Brain disorders include any conditions or disabilities that affect your brain. This includes those conditions that are caused by illness, genetics, or traumatic injury

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies : Alzheimer's Association| American Cancer Society | AARP | Habitat for Humanity | Volunteer Match | Doctors Without Borders | WWOOF | Make-A-Wish Foundation | Peace Corps | Voluntary Service Overseas | Cross-Cultural Solutions | American Brain Foundation | Cure Alzheimer's Fund | Alzheimer's Foundation of America | Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation | Alzheimer's Research & Prevention Foundation | Bright Focus | Lewy Body Dementia Association | The Scottish Dementia Working Group (SDWG) | The Lewy Body Society

Session 4: Neurodegenerative diseases

Neurodegenerative diseases incorporate wide selection of disorders, characterized by the progressive degeneration or death of nerve cells. It affects animal tissue and causes completely different psychological manifestations furthermore. it's Associate in Nursing umbrella term for a variety of conditions that notably influence the neurons within the human brain. Genetic and environmental factors are shown to play an important role within the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Age is one in every of the key risk factors that's common between every type of neurodegenerative un wellness because it progresses at older ages ordinarily

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies : Alzheimer's Association| American Cancer Society | AARP | Habitat for Humanity | Volunteer Match | Doctors Without Borders | WWOOF | Make-A-Wish Foundation | Peace Corps | Voluntary Service Overseas | Cross-Cultural Solutions | American Brain Foundation | Cure Alzheimer's Fund | Alzheimer's Foundation of America | Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation | Alzheimer's Research & Prevention Foundation | Bright Focus | Lewy Body Dementia Association | The Scottish Dementia Working Group (SDWG) | The Lewy Body Society

 Session 5: Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD), also referred to simply as Alzheimer's, is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that usually starts slowly and worsens over time. It is the cause of 60% to 70% of cases of dementia. The most common early symptom is difficulty in remembering recent events short-term memory loss. [As the disease advances, symptoms can include problems with language, disorientation (including easily getting lost), mood swings, loss of motivation, not managing self-care, and behavioral issues. As a person's condition declines, they often withdraw from family and society.  Gradually, bodily functions are lost, ultimately leading to death

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies : Alzheimer's Association| American Cancer Society | AARP | Habitat for Humanity | Volunteer Match | Doctors Without Borders | WWOOF | Make-A-Wish Foundation | Peace Corps | Voluntary Service Overseas | Cross-Cultural Solutions | American Brain Foundation | Cure Alzheimer's Fund | Alzheimer's Foundation of America | Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation | Alzheimer's Research & Prevention Foundation | Bright Focus | Lewy Body Dementia Association | The Scottish Dementia Working Group (SDWG) | The Lewy Body Society

Session 6: Anxiety and Depression

Apathy, depression and anxiety are common conditions experienced by people with dementia. They are known as psychological conditions because they can affect a person’s emotional and mental health. Anxiety is more than just feeling stressed or worried. Anxious feelings are a normal reaction to a situation where a person feels under pressure and usually pass once the stressful situation has passed, or the ‘stressor’ is removed. Depression affects how a person feels about themselves. A person may lose interest in work, hobbies and doing things he or she normally enjoys. Some people may lack energy, have difficulty sleeping or sleep more than usual, while some people feel anxious or irritable and find it hard to concentrate

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies : Alzheimer's Association| American Cancer Society | AARP | Habitat for Humanity | Volunteer Match | Doctors Without Borders | WWOOF | Make-A-Wish Foundation | Peace Corps | Voluntary Service Overseas | Cross-Cultural Solutions | American Brain Foundation | Cure Alzheimer's Fund | Alzheimer's Foundation of America | Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation | Alzheimer's Research & Prevention Foundation | Bright Focus | Lewy Body Dementia Association | The Scottish Dementia Working Group (SDWG) | The Lewy Body Society

Session 7: Parkinson’s diseases

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, meaning that symptoms continue and worsen over time. Nearly one million people in the US are living with Parkinson's disease. The cause is unknown, and although there is presently no cure, there are treatment options Such as medication and surgery to manage its symptoms

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies : Alzheimer's Association| American Cancer Society | AARP | Habitat for Humanity | Volunteer Match | Doctors Without Borders | WWOOF | Make-A-Wish Foundation | Peace Corps | Voluntary Service Overseas | Cross-Cultural Solutions | American Brain Foundation | Cure Alzheimer's Fund | Alzheimer's Foundation of America | Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation | Alzheimer's Research & Prevention Foundation | Bright Focus | Lewy Body Dementia Association | The Scottish Dementia Working Group (SDWG) | The Lewy Body Society

Session 8: Autism

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people perceive the world and interact with others. Autistic people see, hear and feel the world differently to other people. If you are autistic, you are autistic for life autism is not an illness or disease and cannot be cured. Often people feel being autistic is a fundamental aspect of their identity. Autism is a spectrum condition. All autistic people share certain difficulties, but being autistic will affect them in different ways. Some autistic people also have learning disabilities, mental health issues or other conditions, meaning people need different levels of support. All people on the autism spectrum learn and develop. With the right sort of support, all can be helped to live a more fulfilling life of their own choosing

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies : Alzheimer's Association| American Cancer Society | AARP | Habitat for Humanity | Volunteer Match | Doctors Without Borders | WWOOF | Make-A-Wish Foundation | Peace Corps | Voluntary Service Overseas | Cross-Cultural Solutions | American Brain Foundation | Cure Alzheimer's Fund | Alzheimer's Foundation of America | Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation | Alzheimer's Research & Prevention Foundation | Bright Focus | Lewy Body Dementia Association | The Scottish Dementia Working Group (SDWG) | The Lewy Body Society

Session 9: Dementia Diagnosis

Diagnosing dementia and determining what type it is can be challenging. A diagnosis of dementia requires that at least two core mental functions be impaired enough to interfere with daily living. They are memory, language skills, ability to focus and pay attention, ability to reason, solve problem and visual perception

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies : Alzheimer's Association| American Cancer Society | AARP | Habitat for Humanity | Volunteer Match | Doctors Without Borders | WWOOF | Make-A-Wish Foundation | Peace Corps | Voluntary Service Overseas | Cross-Cultural Solutions | American Brain Foundation | Cure Alzheimer's Fund | Alzheimer's Foundation of America | Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation | Alzheimer's Research & Prevention Foundation | Bright Focus | Lewy Body Dementia Association | The Scottish Dementia Working Group (SDWG) | The Lewy Body Society

Session 10: Dementia Management

There is no cure for dementia, so the chief goals of treatment are to: Maintains quality of life, Enhances cognition, mood and behaviour, Fosters a safe environment, Promotes social engagement, Treatment of cognitive symptoms, Managing behavioural symptoms, pharmacological treatments, non-pharmacological strategies, dementia friendly environments

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 11: Dementia and drugs

Dementia is a progressive, irreversible decline in cognition that, by definition, impacts on a patient pre-existing level of functioning. The clinical syndrome of dementia has several aetiologies of which Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common. Drug development in AD is based on evolving pathophysiological theory. Disease modifying approaches include the targeting of amyloidprocessing, aggregation of tau, insulin signalling, neuroinflammation and neurotransmitter dysfunction, with efforts thus far yielding abandoned hopes and on-going promise. Reflecting its dominance on the pathophysiological stage the amyloid cascade is central to many of the emerging drug therapies

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 12: Clinical trials and case reports in dementia

The goal of much of the research activity in dementia is to develop interventions for treatment or even cure. The classical bench to bedside paradigm has been disappointing in dementia. There is a long list of putativedementia treatment compounds with favourable pre-clinical and early phase trial data that have been neutral or even potentially harmful when assessed in phase III studies. Lewy body dementia is a common but frequently under diagnosed cause of dementia often mistaken for the more familiar entity of Alzheimer disease. Clinically the distinction is important, because it can have profound implications for management. The diagnosis of Lewy body dementia has important implications. It is associated with a high incidence of neuroleptic sensitivity, necessitating great caution in the use of these common antipsychotic agents

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 13: Stages of Alzheimer’s

Stage 1: No Impairment

During this stage, Alzheimer’s is not detectable and no memory problems or other symptoms of dementia are evident

Stage 2: Very Mild Decline

The senior may notice minor memory problems or lose things around the house, although not to the point where the memory loss can easily be distinguished from normal age-related memory loss

Stage 3: Mild Decline

At this stage, the family members and friends of the senior may begin to notice cognitive problems. Performances on memory tests are affected and physicians will be able to detect impaired cognitive function

Stage 4: Moderate Decline

In stage four of Alzheimer’s, clear-cut symptoms of the disease are apparent. The fourth stage is followed by fifth and sixth leading to the last stage

Stage 7: Very Severe Decline

The Stage seven is the final stage of Alzheimer’s. Because the disease is a terminal illness, people in stage seven are nearing death. In stage seven of the disease, people lose the ability to communicate or respond to their environment. While they may still be able to utter words and phrases, they have no insight into their condition and need assistance with all activities of daily living. In the final stages of Alzheimer’s, people may lose their ability to swallow

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 14: Causes of Alzheimer’s disease:

Amyloid plaques: Amyloid plaques are dense, mostly insoluble clumps of protein fragments. They leave a highly damaging substance outside and around the brain’s nerve cells. People with AD have a build-up of these plaques in their hippocampus. The hippocampus is the part of your brain involved with memory.

Neurofibrillary tangles: Neurofibrillary tangles are insoluble, twisted fibres that clog the brain from the inside out. Brain nerve cells have a special transport system called microtubules. They act like road tracks and safely guide and transport nutrients, molecules, and information to other cells. An important fibre-like protein called tau is responsible for keeping those microtubules stable.

Genetics of AD: Researchers believe genetics play a vital role in whether you develop AD. In the elderly, the gene called Apo lipoprotein E (APOE). There are several versions alleles of APOE. According to the National Institute on Aging about 40 per cent of people who develop AD later in life have an APOE e4 allele

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 15: Types of dementia

Cortical Dementia: Cortical dementia occurs in the cerebral cortex, the outer layer of the brain. This type of dementia plays an important role in memory and language and people with cortical dementia usually have severe memory loss and cognitive ability 

Sub-cortical Dementia: Sub-cortical dementia occurs because of problems in the part of the brain beneath the cortex. The ability to start activities and frequency of thinking are usually effected by sub-cortical dementia

Progressive Dementia: Progressive dementia becomes worse over time and persons suffering with this disorder eventually lose more of their abilities

Primary Dementia: Primary dementia patients only show symptoms of dementia. Alzheimer’s disease is a form of primary dementia, which accounts for 50%-70% of all dementia cases

Secondary Dementia: A secondary dementia is a form of dementia that develops as peripheral conditions to a pre-existing mental illness or condition

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 16: New leads on treating dementia and Alzheimer's

"For decades, scientists have thought that the dementia and Alzheimer's disease are caused by protein aggregates forming in the brain, but recent trials of drugs that reduce the aggregates have failed", says project leader Professor Robert Richards, from the University of Adelaide's School of Biological Sciences. He is working in collaboration with the University's Adelaide Medical School and the National Institutes of Health, in the US. "Normally our cells bar-code their own products to tell them apart from foreign agents  When these bar-codes aren't in place, our cells can't properly distinguish 'self' and 'non-self' trigger molecules. The result is inflammation that escalates and spreads -- hence the term auto-inflammatory disease." Certain types of gene mutation cause these systems to fail earlier or more often, and can increase as we age -- possibly accounting for age-related increased risk of developing dementia. Secretase inhibitors may halt the A-beta amyloid production, thus by preventing neuronal plaque formation. These kinds of drugs are in phase-1 research. Beta sheet blockers latch onto critical portions of spiral shaped A-beta, helping them maintain the shape. Thus stalling the formation of new fibrils and allowing the body to clear A-beta from the brain, thus forestalling plaque formation

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 17: Therapeutic treatment of Alzheimer’s

The present day available drug therapies for AD consist primarily of cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, Huperzine A) and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist (memantine) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and some neuroprotective agents. these drugs did alleviate some of the psychological and behavioral symptoms of AD patients, effective pharmacological interventions for prevention and treatment of AD, that is, the disease-modifying therapies, are lacking. In the past decade, many hypotheses have been put forward for AD pathogenesis. Among the above drugs, the Beta- amyloid cascade and the tau hyperphosphorylation are the theories that have widely been accepted. Therefore the disease-modifying therapies focus mainly on the agents that will decrease Beta-amyloid content and tau hyperphosphorylation. we review the potential disease-modifying therapies and some compounds that are currently undergoing preclinical and clinical evaluations

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 18: Bio-markers for Dementia

Bio-markers are measures of what is going on inside the living body, appeared by the aftereffects of the research center and imaging tests. Bio-markers can enable specialists and researchers to analyse maladies and well being conditions, discover well being dangers in a man, screen reactions to treatment, and perceive how a man's illness or well being condition changes after some time. For instance, an expanded level of cholesterol in the blood is a bio-marker for the heart assault chance. Numerous forms of bio-marker tests are utilized in investigating Alzheimer'sinfection and related dementia. Changes in the brains of individuals with these clusters may start numerous prior years’ memory misfortune or different side effects show up. Specialists utilize bio-markers to help recognize these mind changes in individuals, who might have evident changes in memory or consider. Finding these progressions ahead of schedule in the sickness procedure distinguishes individuals who are at the most serious danger of Alzheimer's or another dementia and may help figure out which individuals may profit most from a specific treatment

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Session 19: Risk factors

Many factors can eventually contribute to dementia. Some factors, such as age, can't be changed. Others can be addressed to reduce your risk

Risk factors that can't be changed:

Age: The risk increases as you age, especially after age 65. However, dementia isn't a normal part of aging, and dementia can occur in younger people

Family history:  Family history of dementia puts you at greater risk of developing the condition.  Many people with a family history never develop symptoms, and many people without a family history do. There are tests to determine whether you have certain genetic mutations

Down syndrome: By reaching middle age, many people with Down syndrome develop early-onset Alzheimer's disease

Related:  Dementia Congress | Dementia Meetings | Brain Diseases Events | Parkinson's disease Meetings | Autism Meetings | Psychiatry Conference | Dementia Conferences 2020 | Schizophrenia Congress | Alzheimer’s Events | Anxiety Meetings | Biomarker in dementia Conference | Depression Congress | Brain Meetings | Dementia Workshop | Dementia Care Conferences | CNS Disorder Conference

Related Associations & Societies: Alzheimer's Family Services Center | Long Island Alzheimer's Foundation | National Dementia Association  | Guide Star | Creative Commons | American Heart Association | American Cancer Society | March of Dimes | The ALS Association | American Lung Association | National Multiple Sclerosis Society | American Diabetes Association | JDRF | Brain Trauma Foundation | Dana Foundation | Pediatric Brain Foundation | Brain Research Foundation | Brain & Spine Foundation | The Brain Tumour Charity | National Brain Appeal | ARBOR TRACE MEMORY CARE CENTER | Dementia UK | The Alzheimer’s Society | Contented Dementia Trust | Age UK | RICE

Market Analysis Report

About London:

London, the capital city of United Kingdom is a 21st century city with history stretching back to Roman times. At the centre of the city, stand the imposing Houses of Parliament, the iconic Big Ben Clock Tower and Westminster Abbey, site of British Monarch Coronations. Across the Thames River, the London Eye observation wheel provides panoramic views of the South Bank Cultural Complex, and the entire city

Why in London?

At the estimated rate of prevalence, there are about 850,000 people with dementia in the UK in 2015

The total number of people with dementia in the UK is forecast to increase to over 1 million by 2025 and over 2 million by 2051. This in worst case scenario, under an assumption that there are no public health interventions and changes are driven by an ageing population alone

There are over 40,000 people with early-onset dementia in the UK

The total number of people with dementia among over 65's is 7.1% based on 2013 population data

This says that one in every 79 (1.3%) of the entire UK population, and 1 in every 14 of the population aged 65 years and over

Compared to the 2007 estimated data, the current prevalence consensus found there are slightly more people with dementia in the youngest age are 65 to 69 years of age and oldest are 90+ age bands and slightly fewer in the intermediate age groups

Importance and Scope:

The global market for treatments for syndromes of dementia and movement disorders was valued at 10.5 billion in 2011 and should reach $11.1 billion in 2012. Total market value is expected to reach $16.7 billion in 2017 after increasing at a five-year Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 8.5%

Someone in the world develops dementia every 3 seconds. There were an estimated 46.8 million people worldwide living with dementia in 2015 and this number is believed to be close to 50 million people in 2017. This numbers will almost double every 20 years, reaching 75 million in 2030 and 131.5 million in 2050. Much of the increase will be in developing countries. Already 58% of people with dementia live in low and middle income countries, but by 2050 this will rise to 68%. The fastest growth in the elderly population is taking place in China, India, and their south Asian and western Pacific neighbors

Glance at market of dementia:

There were an expected 46.8 million individuals overall living with dementia in 2015 and this number is accepted to be near 50 million individuals in 2017. This number will twofold at regular intervals, achieving 75 million out of 2030 and 131.5 million out of 2050. A great part of the expansion will be in creating nations. Officially 58% of individuals with dementia live in low and center pay nations, yet by 2050 this will ascend to 68%. The quickest development in the elderly populace is occurring in China, India, and their south Asian and western Pacific neighbors. They evaluated for the aggregate number of dementia sufferers worldwide in the years 2015, 2030 and 2050. It is evaluated that there will be around 75 million individuals experiencing dementia in 2030

Statistic maturing is an overall procedure that demonstrates the achievements of enhanced human services in the course of the most recent century. Many are presently living longer and more beneficial lives thus the total populace has a more noteworthy extent of more seasoned individuals. Dementia principally influences more seasoned individuals, in spite of the fact that there is a developing familiarity with cases that begin before the age of 65. There are more than 9.9 million new instances of dementia every year around the world, inferring one new case at regular intervals

The World Alzheimer Report 2015 updates ADI's worldwide assessments of the predominance, occurrence and expenses of dementia in view of efficient surveys. The report makes key suggestions to give a worldwide structure to activity on dementia. The report likewise incorporates a survey of the proof for and against late patterns in the predominance and frequency of dementia after some time and in addition an examination of the more extensive societal effect of dementia. The aggregate assessed overall expense of dementia is US$818 billion of every 2015, which speaks to 1.09% of worldwide GDP. By 2018, the worldwide expense of dementia will transcend a US$ trillion.

Coordinate therapeutic consideration costs represents around 20% of worldwide dementia costs and consideration costs each record for about 40%. The relative commitment of casual consideration is most prominent in the African areas and least in North America, Western Europe and some South American Districts, while the turnaround is valid for social part costs. This implies if world wide dementia care were a nation , it would be the eighteenth biggest economy on the planet

Organizing Committee
OCM Member
Andrea P Rossi
Director, Medicine and the Healthy Aging Center
University of Verona
Aviano, Italy
OCM Member
Joanne
Chair, Society of Organisational Behaviour in Australia, Psychology
Macquarie University Australia
Sydney, Australia
OCM Member
Myeong Sook Yoon
Vice President, Mental Health
Chonbuk National University
Deokjin-gu, South Korea
OCM Member
Sam Vaknin
Professor, Psychology
Southern Federal University
Rostov-On-Don, Russia
OCM Member
Ivanka Zivcic Becirevic
Professor, Psychology
University of Rijeka
Rijeka, Croatia
OCM Member
Michael F Waters
Director, Neurology
University of Florida
Florida, USA

To Collaborate Scientific Professionals around the World

Conference Date March 23-24, 2020
Speaker Oppurtunity Day 1 Day 2
Poster Oppurtunity Available
e-Poster Oppurtunity Available
Sponsorship Opportunities Click here for Sponsorship Opportunities
Venue
&
Hospitality

Park Inn by Radisson Hotel and Conference Centre

London Heathrow

Bath Rd, Sipson, Heathrow UB7 0DU

London, UK

Join The Discussion

Allied Academies Global Conference Directory

Mail us at

Program enquiry
dementia@alliedglobalevents.com
Sponsors/Exhibiting/Advertising
dementiaevent@alliedmeetings.com
WhatsApp Queries
dementiacongress@alliedglobalevents.com
More details about sponsorship:sponsors@alliedacademies.com

Terms and Conditions

Responsibility
Delegates are personally responsible for their belongings at the venue. The Organizers will not be held responsible for any stolen or missing items belonging to Delegates, Speakers or Attendees; due to any reason whatsoever.
Insurance
Registration fees do not include insurance of any kind.
Transportation
Please note that any (or) all transportation and parking is the responsibility of the registrant.
Press/Media
Press permission must be obtained from Allied Academies Conference Organizing Committee prior to the event. The press will not quote speakers or delegates unless they have obtained their approval in writing. The Allied Academies is an objective third-party nonprofit organization. This conference is not associated with any commercial meeting company.
Requesting an Invitation Letter
For security purposes, letter of invitation will be sent only to those individuals who had registered for the conference. Once your registration is complete, please contact dementia@alliedglobalevents.com to request a personalized letter of invitation.
Regarding refunds, all bank charges will be for the registrant's account.
All cancellations or modifications of registration must be made in writing to contact@alliedacademies.com
Cancellation Policy
If Allied Academies cancels this event for any reason, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another Allied Academies event which must occur within one year from the date of cancellation.
Postponement
If Allied Academies postpones an event for any reason and you are unable or unwilling to attend on rescheduled dates, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another Allied Academies event which must occur within one year from the date of postponement.
Transfer of registration
All fully paid registrations are transferable to other persons from the same organization if registered person is unable to attend the event. Transfers must be made by the registered person in writing to contact@alliedacademies.com . Details must be included the full name of replacement person, their title, contact phone number and email address. All other registration details will be assigned to the new person unless otherwise specified.
Registration can be transferred to one conference to another conference of Allied Academies if the person is unable to attend one of the conferences.
However, Registration cannot be transferred if it is intimated within 14 days of the respective conference.
The transferred registrations will not be eligible for Refund.
Visa Information
Keeping in view of increased security measures, we would like to request all the participants to apply for Visa as soon as possible.
Allied Academies will not directly contact embassies and consulates on behalf of visa applicants. All delegates or invitees should apply for Business Visa only.
Important note for failed visa applications: Visa issues cannot come under the consideration of cancellation policy of Allied Academies, including the inability to obtain a visa.
Refund Policy:
If the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her participation to another person or event, then the following refund arrangements apply:
Keeping in view of advance payments towards Venue, Printing, Shipping, Hotels and other overheads, we had to keep Refund Policy is as following slabs-
·         Before 60 days of the conference: Eligible for Full Refund less $100 service Fee
·         Within 60-30 days of Conference: Eligible for 50% of payment Refund
·         Within 30 days of Conference: Not eligible for Refund
·         E-Poster Payments will not be refunded.
 
Accommodation Cancellation Policy:
Accommodation Providers (Hotels) have their own cancellation policies, and they generally apply when cancellations are made less than 30 days prior to arrival. Please contact us as soon as possible, if you wish to cancel or amend your accommodation. Allied Academies will advise the cancellation policy of your accommodation provider, prior to cancelling or amending your booking, to ensure you are fully aware of any non-refundable deposits.

Authorization Policy

Copyright © 2019-2020 Allied Academies, All Rights Reserved.